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There is always the quality versus quantity mantra we all hear. Almost every leader says they stress quality. But, quality does not mean perfection and most people get caught in this trap. Most highly successful people ensure that progress is being made and do not let perfection get in the way.

I know at this point you are going to say wait how about people like the late Steve Jobs and his relentless pursuit of perfect design at Apple. Certainly there is an argument that Steve Jobs would not tolerate anything but perfection but he also realized that progress mattered also. When Steve Jobs came back to Apple he quickly reduced the number of products to devote resources to ensure desired progress could be made.

Insisting on perfection for everything generally results in a bad return on your investment. In the past big brands would have expensive, perfection-focused marketing campaigns that were completely planned out prior to beginning. Nowadays there is a push on agile marketing for a better return on investment since it is an iterative approach that allows for progress and does not require perfection. Another example is people in the past would ensure that they have perfect emails or letters to communicate with their colleagues and this formality had a cost. Nowadays there is a push to use instant messaging or texting to communicate messages with a push towards making progress. Highly successful people are leaders in identifying what “level of perfection” each situation warrants with the eye towards progress.

Here are a few helpful tips to help you avoid the trap of letting perfection get in the way of progress trap:

  • Value: Understand the value of whatever you are doing. This is true whether it is customer facing or not. Not all emails are the same. Not all memos are the same. Not all processes are the same. Knowing what your objective is and what value it is going to provide. Of course when you are talking about releasing a end facing customer product this value is a lot different than putting together an internal memo on some run of the mill internal process change.
  • Perfect vs. good enough: Compare the cost and benefit of the perfect versus good enough. Progress is often ruled by the good enough. There is often a lot of value by implementing something and learning from it and then adjusting it. This is at the core of agile product development and concepts like the minimum viable product mentioned by people like Eric Ries in the Lean Startup.
  • Urgency: Many times there is urgency in getting something completed and by the very nature of spending more time to get perfect will result in the urgency of the item to be missed. Just think of a customer that has a critical problem with your product and they need a solution now. They do not need a perfect solution 4 weeks from now but instead want something now to get things moving again.

Most people want to do a good job and highly successful people want to ensure their brand is strong and they deliver a quality product. However, those same successful people understand that having everything perfect means you just don’t get what you need done. Understand where to put your resources and be alright with saying something is good enough.

As always appreciate your feedback, emails, comments, likes, and re-tweets!

photo credit: Craig A Rodway via photopin cc